Category Archives: Brevets

2022 January 22 Rouleur 125-149 km Pre-Ride Report

Pre-riders: Mitch Ishihara and John Nguyen

Distance: 130K (0.1 km gravel), 81 miles
[The finishing time of 8h 40m is based on the official distance of 130 km. Detours may make the actual route longer. You will still have to finish in 8h 40m.]

Elevation (max / accumulative): 173 m / 1090 m, 567 feet / 3576 feet

Brevet #: 2876 

Name: Sultan Bakery Sandy Coffee Sumerian Beer

Route: https://ridewithgps.com/routes/38225020
[The route may be updated Thursday night/Friday morning depending on the status of flooded roads.]

Features: Sultan Bakery, Sandy’s Espresso, Sumerian Brewing Company

SIR Event Listing

There is a perpetually flooded road through a wetland. Detour required.

These people did not make it through.

Tualco Valley had barns and farm stubble.

There were water-over-roadway signs (but not closed).

Automobiles successfully crossed.

So did we. Too much fun.

Snow decorated the mountain backdrops.

Snow decorated the side of the road too… but melting.

We ate lunch at a bakery.

There were a enough tough hills.

More roads were closed. Detours required.

Rivers ran full.

Sandy’s Espresso was open.

We climbed up Tolt Hill Road above the flooded River Road.

There were nice views from up high.

We rode through a fancy neighborhood.

We saw blue skies and sunsets.

We drank beer.

Good times!

The weather forecast for January 22nd looks promising.

For Woodinville, WA

And for the route…

Aerial view of the route with some photos on Relive.

Comments Off on 2022 January 22 Rouleur 125-149 km Pre-Ride Report

Filed under Brevets, Pre Rides, SIR Rides, Uncategorized

January 15 Rouleur 100-125k Pre-Ride Report

Preriders: Bill Gobie and Bradley Hawkins

SIR Event Listing

There was a landslide.

There were flooded roads. Curiously there were more flooded roads the higher we went.

There was snow. The route is “low elevation (below 300 meters/1000 feet)” they said.

We had a good time.

Conditions should be much better on the 15th.

It will be fun!

Comments Off on January 15 Rouleur 100-125k Pre-Ride Report

Filed under Brevets, Pre Rides, SIR Rides

Summer 300 km Brevet – Three Volcanoes 2.0

Mt Adams from road 2329

Update 5/6/22: The new owners of Hotel Packwood intend to begin taking bookings in June. We will attempt to reserve a block of rooms for riders.


Preliminary route: https://ridewithgps.com/routes/30755658

It has been a long decade since the Three Volcanoes route was last run. (Four Volcanoes is best left unmentioned.) Road washouts and then a plague scrubbed the route. With some luck things will go well enough in 2022 for us to revisit the wild country between Mts Rainier, Adams, and St Helens.

The route has been altered in several places from the old version of Three Volcanoes. We will spend less time on road 23, which carries most of the auto traffic between Randle and Trout Lake. The route visits spectacular Takhlakh Lake beneath Mt Adams. To keep the distance to a manageable 314 km the southern side of the route uses road 30.

In all there are four gravel segments totaling 37 km. Historically the route has been manageable on 28 mm tires. Road 30 has not been evaluated yet.

The ride is based in Packwood, WA. The start will be at dawn, 0500, July 23.

In the past Hotel Packwood has offered economical accommodations. The hotel is being renovated and no one is answering the telephone. We will attempt to reserve a block of rooms but at present riders should make their own overnight reservations elsewhere.

Mt Adams outside Trout Lake

Comments Off on Summer 300 km Brevet – Three Volcanoes 2.0

Filed under Brevets, SIR Rides, Uncategorized

Summer 400 km Pacific Beach Brevet Pre-Ride Report

Pre-drive by Bill Gobie

This ride starts and ends in Bremerton. If you have not been to the Seattle ferry terminal recently give yourself plenty of time to find the entrance. You can buy your ferry ticket online. The “mobile delivery” option will give you a bar code that can be scanned from your phone. If you are riding onto the ferry you can use the bike scanner to the right of the vehicle lanes at the fare booths.

The route is final pending a final review. The link (same as on the SIR ride page): https://ridewithgps.com/routes/37118933

The biggest changes from the previous running of this route are:

  • Massive rerouting of the southwest corner of the route due to horrible construction on WA-109. I think the inland route from Copalis Beach is nicer anyway.
  • Slight rerouting in Hoquiam and Aberdeen.
  • The grill at You & I Market in Pacific Beach is not operating. The store has the usual convenience store items, but fresh teriyaki or burgers are not available.
  • All intermediate controls are info controls.

Other points:

  • The gravel portion of Cougar-Smith Rd is in very good condition. There are no large holes. Stretches are extremely rough, however.
  • Slower riders will have to cover the final 125 km from Montesano without resupplying.

Full disclosure: The picture was taken about 5pm near Union. Only very fast riders will get to view this scene… perhaps make this a stretch goal!

Comments Off on Summer 400 km Pacific Beach Brevet Pre-Ride Report

Filed under Brevets, SIR Rides, Uncategorized

Summer 300k Brevet Pre-ride Report

Mysterious Mountain

310 km, 9000 ft climbing

Pre-riders: Adam Glass, Bill Gobie

The camera doesn’t do justice to my sunscreen

The ride begins and ends in the Renton Village shopping center, 601 S Grady Way, Renton. The start is at the Starbucks. Recommended parking is north across Grady Way at the South Renton Park & Ride. The finish will be at the Applebee’s until it closes at midnight, then at the volunteers’ cars in the parking lot. Fast riders (you know who you are) please text the organizers from Enumclaw so we know when to staff the finish.

This ride will have no on-course support. Carrying adequate water for the climb to Cayuse Pass is essential. Devise a way to carry more water than you normally do.

The forecast is for warm and clear conditions. Be prepared with plenty of sunscreen and perhaps protective clothing.

The descent from Cayuse Pass may be cold, particularly for tired and dehydrated riders. Bring a wind jacket and some warm clothing.


The preride started in early morning sunshine. Clouds soon moved in and conditions remained unexpectedly cool, verging on cold, all the way to Elbe. This was the first time I have been in Eatonville when it was not stinking hot. It’s not all that bad a place.

No rabbits in sight – full speed ahead! Four water bottles!

The route begins with a long roll on the Interurban Trail with its numerous railroad crossings. Many of the rubber tiles at the crossings were recently renewed. Not all, however! Most of the crossings are oblique to some degree, so exercise caution at the crossings.

Stay alert for suicide rabbits. The rabbits look well-fed this year. Hitting one could take you down.

If the weather is clear you should get the first views of Mt Rainier, awakening from its overnight slumber, unaware yet of your approach.

After taking surface streets in Pacific the route transitions to the Sumner Link trail with pleasant views of the White River. The trail has some surprisingly sharp turns so heed the warnings in the route file.

In Sumner you ride the aptly named Traffic Ave, then turn onto Shaw Rd. Shaw begins with a bridge that is steeper than it looks. The extra-wide sidewalk is recommended for the climb.

The next long segment is on the Foothills Trail to Orting. A public restroom with water is located close to the start of the trail. Like the Sumner Link, this trail has surprisingly sharp turns, generally when approaching rail crossings. Expect pedestrian and casual bike traffic to increase as you approach Orting, although it may be relatively light due to the early hour riders should reach Orting. Keep in mind the local drivers expect to have their right of way at intersections.

The route does not follow our traditional way through Orting! The aim is to avoid the busy intersections and pedestrian traffic on the trail in central Orting. Be alert for the right turn onto Whitehawk Blvd. A “landmark” instruction at the school track is intended to wake you up. If you need supplies there is a cue to head off-route at Whitsell.

Next we head south past Lake Kapowsin and Ohop Lake to Eatonville. These roads were unexpectedly quiet on the pre-ride, possibly because we were on them several hours earlier than has been the case with routes that start in Seattle. Turning onto WA-161 expect impatient loud traffic on the climb into Eatonville.

From Eatonville the route follows the less busy option to Alder Lake, highways 161 and 7. Shoulders were good except for a few tight spots. Pretty forest appears. Be alert for deer (and elk) (on the entire route).

Oh deer!

Turning alongside Alder lake on WA-7, Mt Rainier suddenly looms, challenging, “Who approaches?”

“Who enters my domain?”

Running toward Elbe at up to 25 mph we enjoyed a great tailwind. The temperature rose abruptly into the 70s. We walked the evil track crossing just before town.

This crossing is not a peach

In Elbe we found packaged sandwiches (expiration date in August!) at the Elbe Junction, opposite the decaying Heisler logging locomotive. There are several other options for food.

Steel is real

Leaving Elbe we walked the second abominable track crossing. The run to Ashford is generally a false flat. Don’t knock yourself out trying to make speed here. Ashford offers a couple of stores for final supplies before climbing to Skate Creek.

The climb to Skate Creek was well shaded and quiet with good road surfaces. At one point you may feel you are being watched – what, is it Sasquatch? No, the Mountain is surveilling you through the trees. The trees part and the stern, silent Mountain assesses you, then slips back behind the trees. What does the Mountain plan for you?

You persist, mortal?”

The Skate Creek summit transitions gradually to downhill, and then becomes seriously downhill. The road is in much better condition than I have seen it at times, but hazards still abound. Most potholes have been circled with paint, but not all. The dappled light under the trees demands full attention. Be satisfied with listening to the cascading waterfalls. Don’t look at them! Finally the right-hand hairpin turn heralds arrival in Packwood.

Skate Creek

In Packwood we ate at the convenience store at the intersection with US-12. It is now a 76 gas station. The outdoor portable toilets were out of paper; you might want to bring your own supply. There are other food options in Packwood if you go off-route right on US-12. Leave with a full load of water and food.

Heading east on US-12 the climb to Cayuse Pass begins with ascending rollers. They seem fun despite the lack of shade. The temperature rapidly rose into the 90s. Then the Mountain flicks the grade up to 5% and enlists the sun to torment the unworthy. My gps recorded 102 degrees alongside a basalt wall. When you find the rare spot where a tree’s shadow stretches across the road, stop in it and cool down.

Pass the gantlet, and the Mountain grants reprieve on shady WA-123. As a National Park road, commercial truck traffic is banned and most of the car drivers seemed mellow. After about three miles you pass Ohanapecosh Campground. I had drunk so much water in the ten miles from Packwood that I opted to get more water here. It was a good idea. Notes for finding water here and later at Silver Springs Campground have been added to the RwGPS file’s description. These are not in the cue sheet!

Shade on hwy 123

I cannot overemphasize how important hydration on this climb is, and how necessary to carry a great deal of water particularly if you are slow climber. I drank five bottles on this climb plus most of a bottle of liquid food. Don’t be tempted to pour water over your head. With a limited supply it is much wiser to drink your water.

Eventually the tree cover becomes sparse and you are again exposed to the sun. Fortunately the air becomes cooler at higher altitudes. Unfortunately, the air becomes thinner while the grade increases to 4-6%. If you’ve had as little altitude exposure this year as me, you will notice.

Getting high

The only truly unpleasant part of WA-123 is the tunnel at 190 miles. Be absolutely certain to turn your lights on!

Keep plugging along and eventually the Mountain will acknowledge your spirit, permitting your arrival at Cayuse Pass. Don’t fret if you are behind the clock, you’re about to become a gravity bomb. The upper five miles of 410 descend at 7%. Some braking is needed to hang on to the corners and the road surface is a bit rough in places. Drivers may be afflicted with must pass bicycle syndrome despite you perhaps reaching 45 mph or more. I confess it was gratifying seeing how desperately the drivers braked when they realized how hot they were coming into the next curve.

After an info control at Crystal Mountain Blvd you may want to stop at Silver Springs Campground to fill a bottle. Instructions for finding the water are in the RwGPS description.

In Greenwater only Naches Tavern was open when we arrived. Being Sunday night, and being Naches Tavern, they were out of food. Perhaps they will be better stocked on Saturday. The water we got from the bar was vaguely tainted with cherry soda.

We finished the descent to Enumclaw in the dark. This was not fun. I recommend trying to get to Enumclaw in daylight. Enumclaw has numerous food options. We opted for the traditional randonneur repas en plein air, namely chips and soda on a convenience store sidewalk.

From Enumclaw the route courses north across the plain toward Green Valley. We hit surprising pockets of cold air. After dropping into Green Valley the route hits you with a final steep test heading toward Lake Sawyer.

The last fifteen miles are an easy roll down the Maple Valley trail. In the dark don’t miss the turn to the trail from Maxwell Rd. Maxwell becomes steeper downhill just after, so be mindful here. On the trail be careful of the posts at road crossings. At the Renton end of the trail ride slowly and be respectful of pedestrians.

Renton’s one-way streets send us on the usual indirect wander through downtown. There is extensive road construction. Skinny-tire folks should be wary of pinch flatting.

Comments Off on Summer 300k Brevet Pre-ride Report

Filed under Brevets, Pre Rides, SIR Rides, Uncategorized

Brevet Week 600k Pre-ride Report

by John Pearch

The Brevet Week 600k follows almost the same route as the 400k with the exception that the 600k goes to Lake Samish, where the 400k goes to Lake Whatcom.  See Mark Thomas 400k preride report with additional details. One additional small difference is that the 600k takes the Redmond Central Connector trail into Redmond, which goes by the McDonalds and Chevron. Most restaurants close at midnight (as of May 1st), but you need to check on this as closing hours have varied a lot lately. Redmond Inn is not serving breakfast, and only has coffee in the lobby.  When in doubt have some food either in your car or in your hotel room at the Redmond Inn if you are staying there as the overnight.

I prerode the last 215k of this route (after Redmond overnight) on April 24th, on a long rainy day (without credit). 😆 Keep in mind that the last 215k is quite hilly, about 6,000 accumulated feet of climbing. After the overnight you will climb up Union Hill up and over to Carnation, where you can get some awesome coffee at Sandies. From there you will have a steady climb up the Snoqualmie gravel trail, to the tunnel.

The route directs you through the tunnel then takes the stairs up (best option), then left on Tokul Rd.

The route goes through Snoqualmie then North Bend, so stock up where necessary as there are no services for 30 miles after North Bend.  Just after North Bend there is construction on North Bend Way where the shoulder is closed. If you are from the area and know what you are doing, the alternative route is to take the Snoqualmie Trail by taking a left on Thrasher at the Forest Service office and then a right onto the Snoqualmie Trail (gravel), then a left back on North Bend Way.

The climb up to Middle Fork is spectacular. Hopefully the sun comes out for you all on this stretch as this has some of the best views on the entire route! Take caution as there are a couple steel grates about 4 km before the turnaround and also on the return. The info is at the Garfield Ledges trailhead, just past the bridge over the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River.

When returning to North Bend, you could take the Snoqualmie Valley Trail back into North Bend. The bakery in North Bend is the best bakery around!!

When you leave North Bend, the route goes on the Snoqualmie Valley Trail until the golf course and comes into the town of the Snoqualmie the back way. After Snoqualmie, you will climb up Snoqualmie Ridge (along the Snoqualmie Ridge trail-parallels Snoqualmie Ridge Parkway). The info at the Chevron is where all the Alps permanents climb up Lake Alice Rd, where on this 600, you will get to descend down this…but not all the way down!! You will need to take a sharp left turn onto the Preston-Snoqualmie Trail.

The Preston-Snoqualmie trail has some steep gravel switchbacks that is highly recommended to walk your bike down…at least I didJ

Take special caution crossing Preston-Falls City Road at the crosswalk, a very busy road! If you need services, you might want to stop in Preston, as the route avoids all services in Issaquah.  After Preston you will follow the Preston-Issaquah Trail, paralleling I-90 then descend into Issaquah.

Issaquah-Hobart Rd becomes other road names south to Ravensdale and to Black Diamond. About 4k after the Black Diamond control, you will take the Green to Cedar (gravel) trail all the way down to the Cedar River Trail, which will take you all the way into Renton. We took the most direct route through Renton then will be on the East Rail Trail for about 2k, but once you get to the Seahawks training building, the East Rail Trail is still under construction and the route goes on Lake Washington Blvd and trail. You will then take the I-90 trail that will go over the brand new Factoria bike bridge.

After the bridge, you will go down underneath this same bike bridge and also I-90 to go through Bellevue and avoids the 36th. This is the final climb up and over into Redmond.

Please text me when you depart the 2nd day and also when you arrive in Black Diamond so I know approximately when you will be finishing.  For those that finish in the normal hours, PostDoc Brewery is right nearby Redmond Inn that has food truck until about 7pm and still serves beer until 10pm. When Vinny and I prerode the 300k (on May 1st), everything was closed after midnight in Redmond, but found the IHOP in Bellevue open 24 hours. But keep an eye on the services hours as closing hours may change.

Note: All controls are info controls!

These are the changes we made from the 2019 Chuckacamano Middle Fork version:

·         Starts up Paradise Lake Rd

·         Deleted Chuckanut trail option,

·         Goes to Lake Samish and not to Lake Whatcom where the 400k goes,

·         Turns off SR9 onto N Fruitdale into Sedro Woolley and goes through less busy roads in Burlington and Mount Vernon instead of staying on SR9,

·         Returns down into Woodinville and takes the Sammamish River trail into Redmond for the overnight

·         Rerouted the more direct way through Renton

·         Rerouted onto Lake Washington Trail since the East Rail Trail since it is under construction (north of the Seahawks training building)

·         Takes the new bike bridge over Factoria and also goes under I-90 to avoid 36th

Comments Off on Brevet Week 600k Pre-ride Report

Filed under Brevets, Pre Rides, SIR Rides

Mossyrock 200K Pre-Ride Report

[Pre-ride report by John Pearch and Josh Morse]

While everyone else was battling headwinds or flooded roads up north, John Pearch and Josh Morse prerode the Mossyrock 200k with very little rain and no flooded roads.
This route differs slightly from the permanent route (#801) — the brevet takes a more direct route back to Centralia, turning north on Jackson Hwy at 135K. This brevet route was last ridden in 2010 and has about 4600 feet of climbing.

This brevet starts at Olympia Coffee Roasters in downtown Olympia, taking Capitol Blvd/Old Hwy 99 to Tenino.

We chose a great place for control in Centralia — The Station: Coffee Bar and Bistro. Best French Toast Mochas!

Stock up in Centrailia because there is nothing but hills (no services) until you arrive in Mossyrock. Centrailia to Mossyrock is about 55K with 2200 feet of gain. Centrailia-Alpha Road never stops giving.

There are great views of the Mayfield Reservoir while crossing the Tilton River and Cowlitz River bridges.

After Mossyrock there are rollers along Spencer and Jackson Hwy. Enjoy the great views of the Cowlitz River! It’s about 40K from Mossyrock to Mary’s Corner. Services include an on-route Chevron. If you’re trying to avoid gas station services, Avenue Espresso has great breakfast burritos.

Once you get back to Centralia it’s the traditional flat stretch taking you back home to Olympia.

Areas to be extra attentive:

  • Caution in the railroad tunnel on Hwy 99 at 17.9K and crossing railroad tracks at 18.5K.
  • Heading south out of Centrailia watch for traffic as you make your way from Hwy 507 to the control and then across the RR tracks.
  • On Gold St in both directions there are seams in the road that could catch a tire.
  • Mossyrock to Salkum is on Hwy 12 with fast moving traffic but mostly a very nice shoulder for a highway.
  • There is the bridge crossing Mayfield Lake with no shoulder so check behind you before entering and use caution.
  • Northbound as you leave downtown Chehalis on National (becomes Kresky) there is a brief section of road with no shoulder — there is a concrete curb and then a wall. We rode through here at dusk and traffic was not bad but this area and the old pavement deserve some extra attention.
  • The transition from Kresky to Gold in Centralia requires you to take the left lane to follow the turn to Gold.
  • Northbound on our ride it was just after sunset and dark with a fair amount of traffic on Main St and then Harrison.
  • There are good bike lane through the busiest part of town but there can be a lot of traffic so stay visible and alert.
  • It was very dark on the side of the road from Centralia up to Grand Mound with a fair number of cars.
  • Good lighting will be very helpful if you are here after dark.
  • From Grand Mound north to Olympia we saw only a handful of cars to the finish.

Fingers crossed for tailwinds!

Comments Off on Mossyrock 200K Pre-Ride Report

Filed under Brevets, Pre Rides, SIR Rides

Factoria 100K Pre-ride Report

[Pre-ride report by Mark Thomas]

Yesterday, Jan, Rick, Vinny, and I scouted out the route for Saturday’s 100k. I’d like to say that we took the rain bullet for the ride, but it seems that mother nature has more ammunition.

We made a couple changes from the route previously posted on RideWithGPS. Those are now reflected at the same link (https://ridewithgps.com/routes/31749069). Here are a few notes.

  • Early in the route, there is some construction work along the trail, but we had no trouble getting through. I think I saw a post warning of some work on the trail at around 5km that may cause short delays, but we were able to just ride around the vehicles parked in the trail.
  • At km 13, there is an info control. The referenced sign is on the north-east corner of the intersection of Shattuck Ave and Airport Way at the stop light.
  • From km 31-32, we made a route change to eliminate the walk up a muddy trail covered with blackberry vines leading to a cafe that no longer exists (at least not under the name in the old route). Some quick instructions: As you head down toward Maple Valley, stay on the trail under SR-18 overpasses, pass through a tunnel, and ride to a bridge over the Cedar River. The information control question is at the beginning of the bridge. This is also the turnaround point. After the U-turn, proceed back through the tunnel and under the freeway again. Just past the freeway, there is a gravel parking lot on the left side of the trail. About even with the north end of that parking lot, you’ll see some posts on the right. Go through those to get to Maxwell Road.
  • There are a couple of options to re-stock at the mid-point of the ride. At about 41.1km, just after the left turn onto Issaquah-Hobart Road, there is a convenience store end an espresso stand on the left side. Or at km 49.1, just after crossing busy Front Street, there is a convenience store on the right. Note that all of the controls on the ride are information controls, so if you need to restock, you’ll need to do it outside of a control.
  • Just past that, you need to turn from Gilman Road to the East Lake Sammamish Trail. You either need to hop over the curb at the start of the trail or turn onto the sidewalk at the driveway right before the trail (as on cue sheet). If you reach the crosswalk traffic light, you’ve missed it.
  • Recent rains resulted in a mudslide on the trail somewhere around km 56. The trail is closed. There is a trail closed sign just after where the trail crosses SE33rd St. The revised route turns right on SE 33rd to get up to East Lake Sammamish Parkway. This is a bit awkward, because you go up a short pitch and then need to stop and cross the busy parkway to turn left. Be careful. More information is available here: https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/WAKING/bulletins/273c9fe
  • Once past the detour, the easiest navigation is to continue on East Lake Sammamish Parkway to the light at NE 65th and go into Marymoor that way. But if you feel comfortable finding your way back to the trail after the closure, that’s ok too. Just be aware that on at least part of the trail, they have just dumped a bunch of new gravel and it’s deep and loose. Ugh.
  • At the end of the route, around km105, there is a lot of construction. It’s work on a new flyover for bikes to get past the awful factoria intersection, so they’re doing it for us! We were able to get around on the right side even without a shoulder, but at some point after the Honda dealership, we crossed over and used the sidewalk on the south side.

Have fun,
Mark Thomas

Comments Off on Factoria 100K Pre-ride Report

Filed under Brevets, Pre Rides, SIR Rides, Uncategorized

2019 Makeup 200K

Whidbey Island Views & Hills Pre-ride Report

By Mitch Ishihara, Adam Glass, and John Nguyen

Reviving our islands and views theme from previous years1, we bring you scenic vistas on Whidbey Island with the added bonus of sufficiently steep and copious hills compressed into 202K (7900 feet elevation). Whidbey Island’s back roads also offer an escape from (un)civilization showcasing mouth watering baked goods, boutique coffee, plenty of real food options, and of course refreshing beer options at the finish. We reshaped SIR’s RUSA Permanent 998 Whidbey Coast, giving it a trim to down to 202 km and a detour away from the automobile-congested Deception Pass. For those who’ve never been to Whidbey Island, we think you’ll discover why tourists are attracted to it after a sampling on this ride.

Parking

Depending on if you intend to be on the island with a car or ride your bike onto the ferry instead, there are a few common options. Mukilteo has various park and ride locations located along I-5 which is a fair distance from the ferry terminal. Various signed 4-hour street parking spots are located near the ferry terminal up the hill along 3rd, 4th, and 5th Street. These are rumored to be unenforced on the weekend; use at your own risk. Your volunteers took a calculated risk. Also beware of automated speeding cameras on Mukilteo Speedway heading down to the ferry. Of course you can consider giving the city of Mukilteo a modest non-tax-deductible donation.

As for Clinton, it has a park and ride conveniently located near the finish: SR 525 at Clinton P&R.

Departing Mukilteo

After paying the $6.10 fare each at the toll booth, John and Mitch proceeded ‘like regulars’ to the passenger loading zone on the left side of the ferry dock and waited. A morning chat with the friendly ferry attendant ensued as we described our upcoming bike ride on the island – a common destination for cyclists. We scanned our paper tickets and walked our bikes aboard the 7:00 AM ferry sailing. Once on the ferry, you’re allowed to ride the bike to the front to secure your bike to one of the many yellow ropes for bicycles. For those who happen to arrive at the ferry after the cars begin loading, you’ll be boarded last with your bikes at the back of the boat in addition to being last off the boat in Clinton. As an aside, there is an option to pre-purchase your ferry ticket but it is mostly used by folks with an automobile.

Arriving Clinton

The crossing is a quick 15 minutes! Make use of the facilities expeditiously as there is limited restroom capacity at the start. After scouting out a location to process registration on the ferry, we decided we’ll be hanging out on the bow, port side of the ferry. Given the current weather forecast, you may be greeted with this welcoming view below. We disembarked the ferry around 7:15 AM.

Whidbey Island Bagel Factory – Start Contrôle

Finding an open business early on Sunday morning for a manned start location proved a small challenge. A short 2.7 mile and 450 feet ride up WA-525 gets us to an open complex apparently popular with the locals. Barring a misfortune, this stretch should take about 15-20 minutes, in plenty of time for an 8:00 AM start. We arrived at 7:30 AM.

Of course, once Mitch found Whidbey Island Bagel Factory, it was on the list of candidates to verify for the pre-ride. The peanut gallery couldn’t resist commenting on bagels and how many a certain volunteer rider would consume that day. After taking a bite, the commentary shifted to, “these are pretty good bagels.” Good enough for a New Yorker!

    

We were a little disoriented leaving Ken’s Korner Shopping Center heading to the loading zone behind the complex. We’ll get you going in the right direction for the Brevet – head south near the Les Schwab Tire Center. We then turned left onto Surface Road which is a one mile descent down to Bob Galbreath Road.

The Views & Hills

Freeland Park @ mile 19

Freeland Park on the right offers public restrooms for those who need it. For those who don’t, you can enjoy the view while waiting for your riding buddies. Or you can zoom on by covering ground while the clock is ticking.

Honeymoon Bay Road @ mile 20.4

An eastern view of Holmes Harbor down Bercot Road on Honeymoon Bay Road with the Snohomish convergence zone (clouds) in the distance.

Resort Road @ mile 24

The hills, where do we start with this? They are relentless repeats oscillating somewhere between sea level and about 400 feet as the course hugs the coastline of Whidbey Island (hence the original Whidbey Coast permanent). One volunteer brought their fresh legs to this ride while another went all out the day before.

WA-525/WA-20

There are portions of this route which require traveling on WA-525 or WA-20 – the main highway down the middle of Whidbey Island. Ride well on the shoulder at all times on these stretches in single file.

Greenbank Farm @ mile 27

Looking to your left around mile 27, Greenbank Farm shines in the morning sun. Unfortunately they do not open until 10 AM. You can only dream of eating scrumptious fresh baked pies from here for another time. Heads down, we continued on.

Houston Road @ mile 31.4

After you’ve scribbled your info control answer, take a peek at the Olympic Mountains in the distance.

Coupeville @ mile 41.5

About ⅓ of the ride done for the day, we arrived in Coupeville ready to gobble down a few fresh baked goods. We needed the calories later in the day for sure.

Knead & Feed Restaurant

4 Front St NW, Coupeville, WA 98239

https://goo.gl/maps/nXABiepHvuAM4Y4U8

The peach pie features a perfectly flakey crust with an exterior crunch. The peaches are firm and sweet. You may see the volunteers hanging out here the day of the ride too! We promise to try to not eat all of the goods before you arrive.

   

Note that there are public restrooms on Alexander Street on the side of the Coupeville Chamber of Commerce building.

View of Penn Cove @ mile 45

Oak Harbor @ mile 52

By the time we made it to Oak Harbor, the island life awakened with a hustle and bustle. We rode the permanent on April 27th, greeted by a parade and street fair on Pioneer Way. For the May 26th pre-ride, we encountered light traffic. There are plenty of services options in Oak Harbor, as well as Skagit Cycle Center (but it is closed on Sunday).

Descent down Monkey Hill Road @ mile 64.4

What goes up must come down. This is one of the many descents to enjoy on the island. Be safe!

Cornet Bay @ mile 66.5

For the brevet, we rerouted to Cornet Bay instead of Deception Pass Bridge to avoid heavy automobile traffic near the bridge. Cornet Bay features panoramic views in an open setting. Boat tours of Deception Pass are available, though we didn’t take time to do the hour long tour while on the pre-ride.

For the Makeup 200 Brevet, we reserved the picnic shelter below for a SIR manned food stop and contrôle. There’s running water conveniently located nearby.

After finishing our scouting of the location, we left Cornet Bay with about an hour in the bank, returning on Cornet Bay Road back to WA-20. The route continues on WA-20 for 6 miles where we banked some time. The shoulders are wide.

Ault Field Road @ mile 74.1

Swantown @ mile 80

After scribbling down the info control answer we captured some photos on West Beach Road.

A bit further down the road on the right we stopped at West Beach County Park to enjoy the views of Puget Sound.

Callen’s in Coupeville (Fort Casey/Keystone) @ mile 93.6

At about the ¾ mark on the Brevet just past the Coupeville-Port Townsend ferry terminal, there’s a nice restaurant and market, Callen’s Restaurant and Co. The right side features the restaurant. The left side features a market with coffee, drinks, and water. Callen’s is open Sunday 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM. We stopped here for an early dinner.

Cozy’s Roadhouse Finish

We made it to the finish at 6:32 PM with 3 hours in the bank.

Heading back to Mukilteo

There are plenty of ferry sailings to return to Mukilteo departing approximately every half-hour until 12:30 AM.

Schedule: Mukilteo/Clinton

Summary

This is a pretty but hilly 202 km with about 8000 feet of climbing on mostly quiet roads to be completed in the 200K ACP Brevet maximum time of 13.5 hours. We’ve modified the brevet route slightly from the permanent route. Searching the SIR permanent inventory, 998 Whidbey Coast permanent is in the top 10 most climbing for a SIR 200K. The winner is of course 517 The Alps permanent at 9900 feet of climbing over 202 km.

Weather Forecast

The weather forecast for Sunday June 9, 2019 is looking fantastic!

 

Pre-registrations

Help the organizers by pre-registering for this brevet here:

https://www.seattlerando.org/content.aspx?page_id=4002&club_id=928629&item_id=896680

 

 

  1. 2017 Chuckacamano Views 400K, 2016 Island Views 300K (Camano Island and north Whidbey Island), 2015 Bainbridge Island – Port Townsend Easter 200K

Comments Off on 2019 Makeup 200K

Filed under Brevets, SIR Rides